The spirit of Munro lives on

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    Southland Motorcycle Club vice president Garry Jamieson and Burt Munro Challenge sponsorship co-ordinator John Beck unpack Lee Munro's Spirit of Munro ahead of next week's challenge.

    THERE will be an Indian on the beach, and a Munro.

    Lee Munro, the great nephew of Southland motorcycling legend Burt Munro, will ride the Spirit of Munro Indian Scout along Oreti Beach next week.

    The motorcycle arrived in Invercargill last week for Munro to take part in demonstration runs along the beach during the Burt Munro Challenge beach races next Friday.

    There will be no records broken on Oreti Beach with the Indian Scout, but fans will get to see firsthand the bike which Munro has attempted twice to crack the 200 miles per hour (320km/h) record in the MPS-G 1350cc class at Bonneville.

    Last August Munro clocked 192.74 miles per hour on the Spirit of Munro at the Bonneville Salt Flats in the United States.

    Although the motorcycle belonged to the Indian Motorcycle company, Munro said there was still a world record he would like to break riding the Spirit of Munro, which was built in 2017 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Burt’s 1967 record.

    Burt Munro set his final record for the under 1000cc class on August 26, 1967, when he was 68 years old – it’s a record which still stands.

    “I’ve got a few aspirations and dreams that I want to achieve with that bike.”

    Lee, who will be racing a Ducatti the next day at Teretonga Park after the beach race, said he had not expected to be aiming for land speed records so soon in his career as he was still competing in circuit racing. He said he was lucky enough to ride the bike on Burt’s 50th anniversary.

    “I know people want to know what we’re doing and there’s a huge following for what we’re doing. The love the world, the motorcycling community and everybody has for Burt is massive. It’s huge and being part of that is very endearing to me. I love being a part of it.”

    Although nothing had been confirmed, he said he believed he would be back this year at Bonneville to have another crack at the world record.

    “It’s a world record and that sort of stuff rings true in people’s ears when they hear Munro and an Indian broke a world record. That stuff is poetry in my ears. That’s my goal to accomplish that. Yes, we do want to break a world record and we’re looking at doing that.”

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