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Invercargill City Libraries & Archives librarian collections team leader Angela Bain shows workshop attendee John Neilson how to access the libraries e-books and e-audio (talking) books during a SeniorNet South workshop last Friday.

ROOM-FULL of people learnt how to access the Invercargill City Libraries e-books and e-audio (talking) books, as well as local, national and international newspapers and magazines via electronic devices last Friday.

One of the monthly workshops held at SeniorNet South, attendees learnt how to access and download the e-books on various smart devices, including tablets and e-readers, and how to access newspapers online, as well as information about the various services the library provided.

Librarian collections team leader Angela Bain talked about e-books and the various options they offered, including the ability to change fonts, the look of the page from two columns to one, as well as print and font size.

The type and background could also be changed, with white type on a black background, which could make reading at night easier, she said.

With e-audio books, the speed of the voices could be changed to faster or slower, she said.

Librarian Catherine Wilson explained how to access newspapers and magazines, whether local, national or international, via the library’s website.

A Book A Librarian service, which offered one-on-one tuition for half an hour, was also available at the library to help those who preferred a more hands-on tuition, the librarians said.

SeniorNet South publicity officer Lesley Marshall said the library-focus workshop was in addition to the various desk-top and laptop computer-related workshops, including how to use a computer, tablet, iPad or phone for basic computing, spreadsheets, word processing, file and disk management, g-mail, PowerPoint and digital photography the organisation regularly held.

Formed in the United States, SeniorNet is an international organisation which has been running in New Zealand for more than a decade, with the Southland group since mid 1997.

Situated on the ground floor of the Southland Education building, opposite the Invercargill City Council civic centre, the rooms are set up with nine computers for classes.

All the tutors are volunteers who give their time to assist others in closing the “digital divide”.

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