Lots in store for Centre Bush

SHARE
The Store, Centre Bush, assistant manager Nicki Hogg.

THE Store in Centre Bush is celebrating its heritage.

Recently reopened as a grocery store, assistant manager Nicki Hogg said the reaction from “the locals had been very supportive” and they continually received “great feedback”.

“We have only been open for five weeks… it’s getting better and better as word is spreading.”

Manager Marty Garama said he appreciated how the local people and the local community board had helped them.

“It’s been positive all round… we are here to serve the community,” he said.

As well as supplying grocery and household items, a cosy area at the front of the shop had been set aside for those who preferred to sit, relax and catch up with other customers and friends while enjoying a freshly brewed barista-styled coffee. Or for those in a hurry, they could simply get their coffee to go.

Ms Hogg said the store was proving especially popular with truckies, as there was plenty of off-road parking at the front of the store.

The class 2 historical building had quite a history as it had been the central hub of the Centre Bush community, especially in the days when transportation and communication links were limited.

The current building was established in 1920 as a replacement for the previous wooden store, owned by the Stewart family, which had burnt down, Ms Hogg said.

As well as being a general store, during the next century it had also been a saddlery, used as a wood-turner’s shop, a training centre for farm workers, a vet supply shop and an art gallery.

Being spacious, it still retained much of its olden-day charm and atmosphere.

The very small room at the back of the premises, which used to house the only phone in the district and was available for public use, still had the old slanted wooden shelf where the phone would have been.

Adding to the atmosphere, employee Jo Raymond is collating and collecting old photographs of the store, people and area to create a history wall.

Any old photographs would be of interest, Ms Hogg said.

“It’s always cool when people come in and tell us stories about the shop and the area.”

Advertisement