On the case to reduce waste

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Waste Nomads Liam Prince and Hannah Blumhardt will visit Southland as part of their New Zealand tour spreading the zero waste message. Photo: Doug Field

PRACTICAL advice on how to live with a zero-waste footprint will be given by two no-waste nomads who have been living without a rubbish bin for more than three years.

Self proclaimed no-waste nomads Hannah Blumhardt and Liam Prince, from Wellington, will be talking trash with people at various venues including at the South Alive Community Park, in South Invercargill, on Saturday, May 12; Stewart Island Experience’s ferry terminal waiting room on Rakiura/Stewart Island on Thursday, May 17; and at the South Coast Environment Society, in Riverton, on Tuesday, May 22.

Hosted in South Invercargill by South Alive, manager Cress Evans said it was time to “bin the bin”, adding The Rubbish Trip spread the goals of sustainability and was aligned with some of South Alive’s projects and goals, especially its Zero Waste (rubbish programme).

Offering free presentations and workshops, the zero-waste roadshow focused on how and why individuals could reduce their waste footprint.

“At its core, The Rubbish Trip was motivated by the belief that the exchange of knowledge, energy, and solidarity is fundamental for transition to more sustainable, connected communities,” the no-waste duo said.

The duo were inspired to live zero waste because of their concern about the massive amount of plastics in the oceans, the staggering levels of energy and inefficiency associated with producing and managing disposable products, and how throwaway, high-consumption culture was shaping community mindsets and living spaces, they said.

Motivated to spread awareness, they began talking to community groups, schools, businesses and households about how to reduce rubbish and why it was important, which inspired them to step things up a notch and go on a year-long roadshow.

“Our presentations are informative, but also hopeful, based on own experiences of living, since the beginning of 2015, without a bin.

“We have a can-do attitude to reducing rubbish and want to show people how easy, fun and fulfilling waste reduction can be.”

A bonus of the road trip was the people they met along the way who were doing their own amazing projects, whether waste related, sustainability focused, socially minded, or creative, they said.

“The Rubbish Trip was also about sharing these stories… and about us giving back, where we can.”

Ms Evans said bringing the duo to the south was also about encouraging people not only to be waste free, as much as possible, but also to show how proud of where we live in the south by respecting our environment and community, and keeping it as waste free as possible.

“As well as using the community park, there will also be a marquee and the wall of The Pantry/Pod will be used to project images on to.”

As well as The Rubbish Trip talk on the Saturday, South Alive is also hosting a free workshop at The Pantry on Sunday, May 13, to show people how to make easy, unpackaged snacks, as well as DIY household and cosmetic products. It will also cover how to shop, how to live and how to reduce waste. The talk on the Saturday and workshop on Sunday will both run from 4pm-6pm.

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