Name change reflects building’s origins

SHARE

TOP quality, high prestige, exquisite framing is the main aim at Claridge & Brodrick Artisan Picture Framing.

Formerly known as Superframers & The Bank Art Gallery, creative director Beverly Claridge said it was time to change direction, away from incorporating an art gallery to focusing on supplying a more sophisticated art framing and archival printing service.

“Claridge & Brodrick Artisan Picture Framing better reflects our values and who we are,” she said.

“What we do is really great picture framing… we aim to be a level above… exquisite.”

She and her husband Bill Claridge bought the long-standing Superframers & The Bank Art Gallery almost five years ago.

As well as being the creative director of Claridge & Brodrick, Mrs Claridge was also an artist, so appreciated how important it was for artworks, treasures and archival objects to be framed to their best advantage.

“We’ve learnt that great picture framing enhances the power of art and image to transform people’s interior spaces,” she said.

“Our passion is to provide the best artisan picture framing and archival printing services available.

“This means people can get the best result which works for their own spaces and their own purposes.”

Mrs Claridge has more than 30 years of studio arts knowledge, and can help clients have confidence when helping to choose a framing solution which works best for them from the ever-expanding display of mouldings and mats.

“By using the CB-Vista programme, clients can see a virtual image of their finished framed work.”

Being an artisan picture framer means only the best materials are used, as well as the highest level of workmanship, she said.

“Our framing specialist, Brydie Baxter, has more than 12 years’ experience in the framing workshop and is well known for her attention to detail.”

Architect honoured

THE couple chose the new name Claridge & Brodrick in part to honour the architect who designed the former National Bank building at the Troopers Memorial roundabout on The Crescent, as well as many other landmark buildings throughout the CBD.

“It is a sign of the respect and love we have for his work as an architect… we consider Cuthbert John Brodrick (1867-1946) our silent partner,” she said.

“The building is a work of art in itself.”

Mr Brodrick was born in Invercargill and educated at Southland Boys’ High School. An apprentice to the other prominent Invercargill architect, F W Burwell, they travelled to Melbourne, where Mr Brodrick completed his training.

He returned to New Zealand in 1891, before returning to Invercargill about 1897 where he worked as an architect until his retirement about 1943.

Other Invercargill buildings he is credited with designing include the arts and craft/Tudor house-style Alexandra Building (Dee St), the former Bank of New South Wales (Trooper Memorial roundabout) and The Grand Hotel (Dee St). As well as an architect, he also served Invercargill as deputy mayor and as a member of the borough council for three terms.

Built in 1926 in a neo-classical style, the former National Bank was one of the three bank buildings which surrounded the Troopers Memorial and is listed as a category 2 building on the New Zealand Heritage Register.

Mrs Claridge said the building had such beautiful architectural columns, moulded ceilings, friezes and cornices it would be a shame to cover them.

Seating would be available in the upstairs style gallery and on the main floor downstairs for people to relax and appreciate the beautiful character work from a bygone era, she said.

“Nothing is ever hung on the columns… the architecture is so beautiful… it needs to breathe.

“Because of the architecture, we love to share the building… so this area [the style gallery] will be for people who can come in and relate to it as well… they are always welcome to come in and chill out.”

The style gallery will also be a place for people to visualise how their artworks may look.

“Although at this stage the style gallery was a work in progress, it would be made to look like the inside of a home, so people can get an idea of how things, such as the framed artworks, could fit in.”

Advertisement