Habitat opens new store

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Habitat For Humanity Invercargill ReStore general manager Paul Searancke (left), ReStore shop co-ordinator Belinda Zaat-Barber and Habitat for Humanity Invercargill web developer Alice Lee, all of Invercargill, at the opening of their new second-hand store, The ReUsery on Dee St last week. Photo: Abbey Palmer

WITH a goal to brighten up one of Invercargill’s main streets, reel in tourism, and generate funds for building healthy communities, Habitat for Humanity has opened a new second-hand store ReUsery.

Last Wednesday, Dee St became home to the charity organisation’s latest store.

Full of vintage goods, quirky finds, and unique antiques, a myriad of second-hand goods was up for sale at 78 Dee St also known as the old Regent movie theatre building.

Habitat For Humanity Invercargill ReStore general manager Paul Searancke said the intention of opening The ReUsery was to “bring a bit of life back” to the Dee St section.

“Obviously we want to make a profit, but the goal was also to tidy up this area of the CBD and improve it.”

He said it was an opportunity to give the community something to do.

“We want more people coming to the city, not leaving it.”

Just six weeks ago, the decision was made to start up the store, he said.

“Creation Signs have done a fantastic job on the signage… If we can attract more people to the area that’ll be great.”

Future plans included hosting information evenings, workshops on topics such as up-cycling, and even running a coffee shop out of the store, he said.

“It’s an opportunity for volunteers to learn some new skills as well.”

In addition to selling pre-loved goods, the shop would be home to electric bike brand, EBikesNZ.

Habitat for Humanity Invercargill web developer Alice Lee said the bikes were available for sale and hire during business hours.

“We’re hoping to encourage tourism in Invercargill. We have developed an app [phone application] for the electric bikes where people can choose from about 12 tracks around the city [to follow].”

Additional routes would be added over time, or riders could customise their own routes, she said.

“It’s more convenient having it in the main CBD because there will be more people coming through here.”

Although it was still early days for the business, there were high hopes it would attract more visitors, she said.

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